Inuit Art Blog / sell soapstone carvings

How to Sell Inuit Soapstone Carvings

Message to clients: We do not purchase carvings from private sellers. Our mandate is to support the Inuit carvers only. 

We have been getting a lot of questions lately like “how do I sell my Inuit art collection that I inherited?” or “I am downsizing and cannot bring my large collection of Inuit soapstone carvings with me, what would you recommend?” There are many ways to sell you soapstone sculptures, here are a few of them.

First and foremost, you absolutely need to get your piece appraised. To do this, you need to contact a certified Inuit art gallery in your local area. If you are not in a location where there is an Inuit art gallery, we offer appraisals via correspondence. Here is the link on our gallery website which will guide you through the entire process.

Why is this first step so crucial? Because it will give assertion to your potential buyer that the piece is authentic, is worth what you say its worth, and includes a certified document. Having your piece appraised is the same as having a carfax review when buying a pre-owned vehicle, or having an evaluator appraise a home in order for the bank to issue a mortgage.

Once this step is complete, then the second step is to try to find a buyer.

NOTE** WE DO BUY PIECES FROM TIME TO TIME. Please do not call us. Instead, send us pics, description, artist name and measurements with AN ASKING PRICE to info@inuitsculptures.com.

We will not entertain any offers without an asking price.

Also, you are contacting us, we are not contacting you. So to finalize any sale, you must send it to us first. Upon delivery and acceptance, we will pay you for the agreed upon amount.

Some other Inuit art galleries may be interested, however, they are usually accustomed to buying directly from the Inuit. However, if it is a rare and older piece, they may be interested and can offer a fair price for them.

Second, advertise your collection of Inuit sculptures on Kijiji and Craigslist. It won't cost you anything and you’ll get a world wide exposure. Try to take good pictures, it may even be worth going to a photographer and getting professional pictures done.  

Third, contact auction houses that sell Inuit art. Two major ones are Waddingtons; based in Toronto, and Walkers; based in Ottawa. Google them for contact info. They run Inuit art auctions two-three times a year and are constantly looking for pieces to take on consignment. Usually you would have to pay an insertion fee even if your soapstone carvings doesn’t sell, so it’s a bit of a risk.

Last, but not the least, go to your local antique shops and ask them if they would be willing to take a look at your collection and possibly buy it.

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