Gorgeous Green Impressive 15" Muskox by Toonoo Sharky

Toonoo Sharky



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Inuit art: Muskox
Inuit Artist: Toonoo Sharky
Size: 15" long, 10.5" high, 5.5" wide. Weight: 25.4 lbs
Community: Cape Dorset, NU
Stone: Serpentine (fantastic brown), caribou antler (for the eyes)

 id-bhbeCONS114-621588

Museum Quality Sculpture!

This is a real masterpiece carving by none other - Toonoo Sharky. The stunning gorgeous pale green stone he uses absolutely radiate the entire room. It contrasts marvellously to the beautiful inlayed eyes made from caribou bone. The carving is very large, impressive and a definite conversational piece for all your audience. The proportions are perfect and the composition is very unique and original. Toonoo usually crafts transformational pieces, so when i saw this gorgeous Muskox by him, i jumped at the occasion. Again, if I may repeat myself, it is the green tones with the gorgeous eyes that really made me take notice of it.

It's very refined and perfect that you can tell right away that a master carver created it. It has an incredibly positive and happy look. Reason why this is a masterpiece:

1. Famous Inuit artist - Toonoo Sharky.

2. Very rare subject for Toonoo (great investment value)

3. Fantastic colour - rich pale green

4. Peaceful and happy facial expressions.

This is a centre piece of our collection! The carving is signed on the bottom and comes with an igloo tag.

Toonoo Sharky (1970 - )
"Toonoo's parents, Josephee Sharky and Ragee Killiktee, were both carvers, though he credits his grandfather, master carver Kuppapik Ragee and his uncle Shorty Killiktee as influences. Toonoo started carving at ten, began to get serious at thirteen and first exhibited when he was just 17. He is regarded as one of the most exciting young carvers to emerge in the Arctic. His themes include fanciful and quite dramatic treatment of wildlife, particularly birds, and transformational works that are both powerful and humorous. His work is widely shown, and he was elected to the Royal Canadian Academy in 2003." *
* from "Cape Dorset Sculpture", Douglas & McIntyre, 2005

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